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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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Us 42, New York City 27, Afghanistan 25, New York 21, Eliot Spitzer 20, Washington 20, Egypt 18, Rick Perry 15, Mika 14, America 12, Anthony Weiner 12, Cairo 10, Angie 9, Willie 9, Joe 9, Texas 9, Mark Halperin 9, Ntsb 8, Nicolle Wallace 8, Joe Biden 8,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    July 9, 2013
    3:00 - 6:01am PDT  

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rick perry won't run for re-election to be governor of texas, so he's young, he's handsome, what's he going to do his next career step? john tower has a few answers. >> cowboy hat model and we agree. he looks good. >> looks good in a half. >> el mar on twitter three possible moves number one professional hair model number two 2016 gingrich senior adviser and sorry forget the third. >> we had a lot of one and two and forget three. one said he should run the nra and we lost a lot of talent on "saturday night live" and a few thinks he should do a few cameos to lighten things up a little bit. thank you, john tower. "morning joe" starts right now. all right. good morning. it's tuesday, july 9th.
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welcome to "morning joe." with us on set former communications director for president george w. bush and former senior adviser for the 2008 mccain presidential campaign nicolle wallace, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin, and in washington, d.c., senior political editor and white house correspondent for the "the huffington post," i think he would like calendar model in there as well, sam stein. >> he is hot. >> joe -- >> holy cow. >> yes. i think that's a word that comes up with sam. don't you think, guys? >> that is. the guy is so hot, how hot is the guy? this guy is so hot, he should run for comptroller of new york city. >> exactly. >> we are going to get to that, joe. i don't -- i'm not going to read them out loud. i don't know if you can see this. >> willie geist, what do we have? >> don't say willie geist, what do we have? >> better than that.
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>> it's -- >> hold them up. >> willie geist, read them. i am -- >> i don't like that one. >> mika, hold up the newspaper. >> "new york post," sleazy does it. and "the daily news" there. >> willie, "daily news," man, has some pretty good headline writers too. >> ellioiot spitzer on the show today. i have no problem with that. because we can ask him questions about all this. i think it's weird to have him on and not which is what we did once. but we'll do it the right way today. >> me kashgs not just the tabloids, the "new york times" has an editorial where they say eliot spitzer from the kardashian party. about his personal ambition and to leave us out of his personal journey to redemption. >> you know what, willie geist, you know what -- >> sounds like he's running for -- >> these people said the same thing about blago.
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this is offensive to me. why is it you got people that care, people that care, nicolle wallace, and all they do is get kicked around because they dare to put themselves and their family and their beliefs and values out there and all blago was doing is trying to give kids health care. same thing with spitzer. leave him alone. there's also tons of news out of the white house. the president on afghanistan, i know we're going to get to that, that is big news. of course egypt -- >> getting tough. >> continues, continues to move towards a crisis. a lot of news out of there. and so much more to talk about. i guess we got anthony weiner's main opponent, i know she's worked her entire life to be defined that way. christina quinn will be here. >> is a very interesting candidate. and i think the mayoral race in new york city is in many ways a great conversation on the set.
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first we begin with the latest on the catastrophic crash of asiana flight of 77 214. why the pilots came in slower than their target speed. tom costello reports. >> reporter: emergency chutes seen deploying in this new video taken after the crash of flight 214. passengers are seen running away from the burning aircraft as fire rescue crews pour foam on the fire. new video of the crashp. after ripping off its tail on the seawall the 777 seems to jump in the air and nearly flip over before slamming into the ground. >> i thought before i left the plane that it might blow up and i might die. >> reporter: a feeto of the teenagers from china killed in the accident. investigators are looking at whether one of them may have been hit by an arriving fire engine. on the ground, ntsb investigators have been walking the length of the runway inspecting a scattered trail of
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debris. the landing gear sheered from the fuselage and the interior of the plane itself, oxygen masks hanging, seats twisted and broken. >> the lower portion of the tail cone is in the rocks at the seawall. and there was a significant piece of the tail of this aircraft that was in the water. >> reporter: we learned that the pilot new to flying the 777 and his training pilot allowed their air speed to drop well below the 137 knot target for landing as they descended quickly. three seconds before the crash, the plane was stalling at just 103 knots. not a mistake you expect from veterans. >> there was a lack of interaction between the two pilots. the pilot that was actually manipulating the flight controls and a pilot who should be monitoring air speed and altitude and sync rate. >> reporter: the ntsb says it wasn't until four seconds before the crash there were any system warnings of a stall. investigators plan to interview the crew in english and korean
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to ask what was happening in the final seconds of flight. because both pilots were senior, did each assume the other was monitoring speed and altitude. nbc news avelation analyst former captain john cox. >> what was the demeanor of the inner workings of the crew, how effective were they working as a team. that's the question we have to have answered. u.s. troops are supposed to be out of afghanistan by 2014 but now the president may be considering a speedier exit. "the new york times" reports president obama is considering moving up the withdrawal and not leaving a residual force behind. in large part because he has grown frustrated afghan president hamid karzai. according to the paper the two leaders attempted a video conference last month to smooth things over, but it reportedly ended badly with the afghan president accusing the americans of trying to negotiate peace with the taliban and doing that without him.
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joe, president obama i think running out of patience with the situation there. >> you know, yes. and, of course, there's so much to be concerned about here. of course neocons will be concerned that we're going to leave no troops there. of course. i'm concerned, i know you are, all of us are concerned that it's taken now four years to get to this point. we're essentially where we were four years ago. joe biden was there four years ago. i don't know if people remember but, mark halperin, there was that scene in 2008 where joe biden went over, met in afghanistan, met with karzai, he was still a senator then, he got up, he threw his, you know, napkin down, stormed away from the table, and joe biden said then, privately and publicly, to some people, that we just did not -- we never would have a partner in karzai. and it has seemed painfully obvious for a lot of us for a
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very long time, for joe biden as well, i think though this is -- i think at the end of the day, this is where the president wants to be with his legacy, that he ended the war in iraq, he got the troops out of afghanistan, and i know congress is going to raise hell but i think the american people would be with him if he did this, wouldn't they? >> you know, if karzai had turned out to be thomas jefferson this still probably would have been a tough time. people on this program for years have been saying, there's no way with someone so unreliable that this could work out. and i'm sure i know the president has had suspicions about that not just because the vice president has warned him and other have warned him. this is a horrible thing to have happened and i think, you know, the "times" story it is a turtle on a fence post, the reason "the new york times" has that story, whether trying to send a message to karzai to see if he can turn around i don't know. but it seems clear whether there
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is a resid dull force or not the direction this is headed is to almost all of american troops out of there and hold our breath and wait to see what happens then. >> nicolle wallace the longest running war in american history, our men and women continue to die tragically over in afghanistan. george w. bush is going to be judged harshly for a lot of decisions he made going into iraq and i suspect barack obama when given the choice to start moving out of afghanistan four years ago or tripling the number of troops is going to be held accountable for that as well. this is a story, this is a war, that hasn't ended well and has become the definition of mission creep where you go in for one reason and you stay for another and instead of trying to kill terrorists you try to rebuild the country and that just didn't work out in afghanistan, it didn't work out in iraq. it was a failed experiment that
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cost us trillions and cost the lives of so many americans. >> well, and what really drives home just how long this has gone on, i think a lot of us had the opportunity or the privilege to visit college campuses and when you go talk to a class of 18 or 20-year-olds and you have to go all the way back to 9/11 to explain why we're there in the first place and it really i think hits home how long we've been there. now, some republicans will say that -- why of course this war should end and i know that everyone in this program has been calling for that for years now. but there are a lot of republicans who will urge that we work with and listen to the military commanders and, of course, once america leaves then any and all of our coalition partners will leave too. this country will hopefully, but likely, fall into the hands and become a threat to the homeland again. >> willie? >> joe, quickly to the point you made about the length of the war. in "the new york times" the piece about afghanistan and right at the bottom of the piece
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they have names of the dead. this morning there's an 18-year-old private in arrow milliard from birmingham, alabama. he's 18. that means when the planes hit the buildings he was 6 years old. so think about that. if you started this war in october of 2001, could you ever have imagined we would be talking about 2014, almost a decade and a half later as the exit date. >> willie, it's unbelievable. tom ricks warned about this. so many years ago, when he wrote his book about the wars that we're engaged in and he said, there are kids standing outside of their homes this morning at a bus stop going to first grade that are going to be casualties one day and willie, that's exactly what's happened. and the great tragedy is, so many people in washington should have seen this coming. it was obvious. karzai is not somebody that we could be -- that would ever be a reliable partner.
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>> that is certainly unbelievable how long this has gone on. when you put it in those terms, willie, it's -- a national embarrassment in some ways because we are so disconnected. i bet there are some people surprised to hear we are still losing lives and limbs and drain our system in the war in afghanistan. i think the president is absolutely right. you know what, come what may quite frankly over there at this point which is hard to say because there are women, there are parts of the system there that are cruel and unfair and they need us but i don't think we can do it anymore. >> there are a lot of countries that need us. >> yeah. >> and we can go back to when richard holbrooke came on the force and was forced to defend afghanistan and we would ask him, we would ask everybody on the show, never made any sense, why are we in afghanistan still. well because of pakistan. why are why in afghanistan in because of india, because of the region, because of this.
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we were never in afghanistan because of afghanistan. because everybody knew that afghanistan couldn't be fixed but we were there and you talk about the disconnect, this is the most shocking thing and we've talked about this all the time and we talked about this in real-time in 2009 and 2010 and 2 2011, of all the speeches we've given, the book tours we've done, college campuses we went to, civic organizations we went to, we never had one person stand up and say, you know what, that war in afghanistan, i'm for it. i understand why we're spending $2 billion a week. mika, over four years, in over 400, 500 events never once did one person say, yeah, we need to be in afghanistan. they would say we need that money at home to rebuild our schools, not to build their schools. and this is one of the greatest disconnects i think between washington and middle america
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over the past five years that i've seen. >> i think the president is on the pulse of that and i think he probably rather would do more, there are at this point obviously ramifications to pulling out quickly, but the taste for that i think is becoming more -- >> we've been there 13 years. >> it's too long. >> been there 13 years. you're not moving up, not leaving quickly after being there 13 years. >> all right. let's move on to egypt. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a national uprising, accusing the military of stealing last year's revolution by force. the call for action came just hours after an early morning attack on protesters near a military compound in cairo. egyptian health officials say at least 51 people died and more than 400 were injured in that attack. military officials say they were responding to a, quote, terrorist group trying to storm the building. meanwhile the country's interim president announced a timetable
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to amend the constitution, establish a new parliament, and elect a president. the new government is expected to be in place by early next year. white house officials say they are watching the situation in egypt closely, but are not yet ready to call the military's action a coup. >> this is a complex situation and it is not in our interests to move unnecessarily quickly in making a determination like that because we need to be mindful of our objective here, which is to assist the egyptian people in their transition to democracy. >> mark halperin and then willie. just the reason to not call it a coup has to do with money, obviously. it's not that the president is parsing words. >> there are requirements under the law. right now the united states is in a very tough position. because we don't want to say that you can overthrow democracy with a military coup. our closest ally in that country
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is the military. it was in the last changeover in government. there's extraordinary concern about stability in the region and israel's security, and, you know, it's easy to criticize -- >> call it a coup and you're farther away. >> easy to criticize the administration but i think right now with no great choices being for stability, trying to see if democracy can emerge is the best option. >> absolutely. willie? >> nbc's foreign correspondent ayman mohyeldin is live in cairo this morning. good to see you. an ugly day there yesterday. >> it was. you know, it's kind of strange these days, waking up in cairo and saying, you know, it's off to a good start when you don't have any casualties to report. that has been the case today. the day you were talking about yesterday was one of the bloodiest egypt has seen in the past two years. as we were talking more than 51 people were killed. not yet quite sure exactly how it started because depending on who you ask, you're getting two very different narratives. the military says it was guarding the republican guard headquarters. its soldiers came under attack,
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opening in self-defense. they released footage showing various assailants trying to storm the republican guard positions. now if you ask the protesters and the muslim brotherhood supporte erers that were there,y said they were engaged in morning prayers as we have been every day for the past week staging the sit-in and they came under attack. the one thing most people are assure about, it was a chaotic scene and it has narrowed this confrontation between the military and muslim brotherhood supporters and that has a lot of people here thinking egypt may see a new wave of violence between these two organizations. the military which ousted the muslim brotherhood president and his supporters in the streets since that happened. >> how could there possibly be political reconciliation, the one that we've been talking about and the military has been talking about that would include the muslim brotherhood, if people are being shot in the street? >> absolutely. that is the million dollar question. the interim government doesn't have a prime minister, doesn't have a cabinet. it just has a president.
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he's trying to convince the muslim brotherhood and islamists to come back in the political process. that is a hard sell. you're trying to convince them the first time around democracy didn't work, it was ousted, but come back into the mix we'll give it another shot. they're not buying it. they feel even if they win the next round of elections they will be ousted once again. people on the streets are extremely anxious and losing more confidence by the day in the institutions of the state with the exception of the military. it's polarized egypt in a very negative way. >> amman, quickly, want to ask you about this report that multiple staffers have resigned from al jazeera's egyptian channel over their concerns they say that the network's coverage has been biased in favor of the muslim brotherhood. what are you hearing on that? >> that's correct. at least 22 staffers working for that channel which is kind of the equivalent of an like a an egypt c-span run by al jazeera resigned yesterday because they felt over the course of the last several months under the muslim brotherhood rule al jazeera was not accurately portraying what
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was happening on the streets. it was being biased in describing protein testers and not representing both sides of the story. yesterday they resigned in mass and more importantly actually here in cairo at a press conference for the military and police an al jazeera reporter was forced out by other journalists that felt that the presence of that reporter was not fair, was not accurate and so they forced that reporter to get up and leave the press conference. so some are looking at it from the sense of politics but also from an expression point of view and freedom of media. there are human rights activists expressing concern there's a crackdown against al jazeera and other satellite channels here. a lot of developments happening in the media worlds as well. >> ayman mohyeldin in cairo, hope today is more peaceful than yesterday. thanks so much. sam stein, your thoughts on egypt here. hard to see how these groups come together when they're being shot in the street by the in illtry. >> yeah. it's a hot mess. i mean there's very little chance of political reconciliation in the interim. i read a report this morning
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that muslim brotherhood is already rejecting the timeline set forth by the interim president for new elections and a new constitution. and you can't really blame them. what happened was egypt's first free elections were overturned by the military in a year. he can quibble all day whether you want to call that a coup but at the end of the day it's alienating to the people who supported those elections. the critical player i think going forward is probably morsi himself. you know, the military needs him to buy into this process because he can bring along, you know, good swath of his followers. but i would have to say he's probably not in the best mindset to want to play ball at this juncture. i don't really see any good solutions here. i think the administration is being probably appropriately cautious with respect to aid but i can't see how this gets better in the next couple weeks or days. >> all right. coming up on "morning joe," former governor eliot spitzer joins us on set to explain why he's making another run for public office.
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christine quinn on her bid for mayor of new york city. later basketball star ray allen heading to capitol hill for a push for health research that hits close to home for him. up next the top stories in the politico playbook. but first bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> good morning to you, mika. thunderstorms will be strorory the u.s. all eyes on tropical storm chantal towards haiti and dominican and possibly the u.s. southeast coast. 50 mile per hour winds. not expected to become a hurricane. we are watching the storm heading over haiti and dominican republic. by the end of the weekend the storm will be near the bahamas off the southeast coastline and what makes this forecast interesting is that then it should head towards the carolinas, georgia, or north florida come about monday or tuesday next week. we're also tracking pretty strong storms at this hour through minnesota. so minneapolis, to rochester and sioux falls, south dakota, be
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ready for that. this afternoon everywhere in yellow chance of strong thunderstorms that includes detroit, chicago, milwaukee and back down towards kansas city. just be prepared for the storms in the middle east and we'll watch tropical storm chantal as it makes its journey towards the southeast coastline in the days ahead. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. hi! i'm sandy, and after nine years of working at walmart, i know savings. and right now we've got everything you need for a great summer. this 5-piece dining set on clearance, save over $49! marco! polo! and these op swim separates, on rollback you save over 20%. this nook hd's on rollback. you save $40. great for summer reading. coolers on rollback. sunscreen on rollback. and these towels on rollback. so soft.
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when you experience something great, you want to share it. with everyone. that's why more customers recommend verizon, america's largest 4g lte network. welcome back to "morning joe." a live look at the white house. take a look at the morning papers. from our parade of papers, the "dallas morning news," country super star randy travis was admitted to a dallas hospital on sunday.
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the 54-year-old suffering from weakened heart muscles following a viral infection. he's currently listed in chitcle condition. >> let's go over to the l.a. "time" california facing what could be the largest prison protest in state history as 30,000 inmates are refusing meals. the inmates are protesting the use of solitary confinement in the prison system. this comes amid allegation california prison officials authorized the sterilization of 150 female inmates from 2006 to 2010 done without the approval of the state or the inmates themselves. and "the new york times," ceo of barnes & nobles resigned yesterday, two weeks after news broke that the company is buckling at the hands of competition -- competitors like amazon. the book seller is trying to recover after attempts to book the nook e-reader came up short.
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barnes & noble plans to separate the digital and retail divisions with a possible self its nook business to microsoft. "washington post," 13 people are dead, as many as 50 still missing after a train crash in quebec. another report this morning says firefighters disabled the air brakes on a locomotive after responding to a fire aboard the same train earlier that friday night. later, tanker cars somehow came loose after the operator parked it for the night. they picked up speed as they rolled into the town center derailing, exploding and destroying at least 40 buildings. >> and "usa today," former secretary of state hillary rodham clinton was honored with a new library bearing her name. the hillary rodham clinton children's library and learning center was dedicated in little rock, arkansas, in tribute to her long-standing advocacy for children. the former first lady read the classic which, of course, i was just reading last night. >> i know you were. >> for myself.
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the very hungry caterpillar and also took a tour of the library during the ceremony. that is a dam good book. bill and chelsea were in attendance. i'm going to read it like right now. >> okay. >> that sounds good. why don't we go to politico while joe reads the hungry caterpillar. >> with us now the chief white house correspondent for politico mike allen with a look at his world famous playbook. good morning. >> good morning, guys. >> let's talk about cory booker and that senate primary here in the state of new jersey. the late senator frank lautenberg's family has announced it will endorse congressman frank pallone instead of corey booker to fill the lautenberg seat. no love loss here. >> great drama and a payback from beyond the grave for senator lautenberg. he was so irritated at newark mayor cory booker's efforts to push him out of the race.
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mayor booker wouldn't wait. said he was going to challenge senator lawsuitp burg, senator lautenberg thought respect should be paid. cory booker should wait. at one point he called cory booker a naughty boy like his kids should get a spanking. now senator lautenberg and his family is saying go with a work horse not a show horse. they're endorsing another frank, frank pallone, the congressman, in this primary that's coming up in august. and saying cory booker is not -- would not continue the same tradition. they're saying stick with frank is the way they're putting it instead of frank lautenberg, frank pallone. >> it's a tough statement. frank pallone knows gimmicks and celebrity status won't get you far in real battles and go on to say it's about your principles and not your own glory. this is a race where cory booker
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has a huge lead in the primary. the lautenberg family is backing someone at about 9%, 10%. very interesting there. another story you have up, texas governor rick perry announcing yesterday he will not seek another term. so what does this mean for his political future? everybody is wondering now if this means he's going to go back in for another run at president? >> yeah. he didn't rule it out and we are seeing this a lot. paul ryan is not going to rule out running for president. you don't pay any price for staying in. in fact, you get rewarded for leaving your name out there. you're more likely to be covered. governor perry will be in the news a lot in the next couple days as texas takes up the special session with that abortion bill that was defeated because of the democratic filibuster. governor perry has had an amazing run. he's the state's longest serving governor. this is the successor to george w. bush. the only governor texas has had since george w. bush, re-elected three times. so politically strong but not
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any longer. a poll showed 60% of texans thought he should go. and a lot of it is because of how his presidential race played. "the washington post" dan bowles has a book coming out on the election collision 2012. in there he talks to governor perry about his oops moment when he flubbed it in the debate and perry blamed it a little bit on his back surgery saying that he had been a runner, he had run a ton, and that was his decompression method because of his back surgery he couldn't run. that was part of what put him off his game. >> mark, you were also putting the finishing touches on a book about the 2012 campaign out this fall. based on what you know about the performance of rick perry and that 2012 race, would he be able to recover and run again in 2016? >> plenty of people run and fail. he doesn't feel clearly he got a clean shot at it.
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he got in the race so late and had problems. he would like to have some redemption to run and do better than he did last time and to prove that he's a national player. so i would be more surprised if he didn't run than he did run right now. >> would his performance hurt him, the things like the slip up and the debate and others we can lay out? >> you get a lot of second chances in american politics. if he figured out a way of what happened and decisions for the country i don't think it would be a big deal at all if he performed better the second time around. >> mark will agree that people around perry have started to talk to big donors, talk about how a run would play, suggesting he wants to start raising money to do it. >> i'm sorry, joe. >> i was going to say listen, it is -- i agree with mark halperin that what happened four years ago or what will have happened in four years ago, when we get around to 2016, won't matter to primary voters. they care about one thing.
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and they're going to care about one thing. can a candidate beat hillary clinton. if rick perry comes out and rick perry's confident and he's not the same guy he was the first time around, and it is a horrif horrific process the first time around and most americans understand that. if they think rick perry can give hillary clinton a run for their money. we all had a lot -- it is a difficult process running for president. the second time around most everybody is better than they are the first time around. nicole, i'm sure you'll agree with this, if the second time around rick perry has the confidence and yes, i'll say the word, has that texas swagger and he believes he can beat hillary clinton and he gets primary voters in iowa to believe he can beat hillary clinton, they'll give him not only a second chance -- >> possibly. >> his vote. >> possibly, nicole. but as you might contest some people are unfixable.
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>> look, i think most republicans are hoping we can do better than rick perry. i think that i wasn't -- >> so says the bush person. i'm sorry, go ahead. >> bush whose approval rating is now higher than president obama's, but -- >> no. i was talking about there's a feud between the bush people and the perry people. that's all i was saying. >> i celebrated his entry into the primary. i think i found him refreshing and i had high hopes that in that field that wasn't very inspiring, that he would be like his predecessor. you know, someone who called it like he saw it and had that texas frankness, but i think his problems for the republican party are that he isn't inspirational. he isn't innovative. he isn't new. i think most republicans are hoping we can do better than rick perry. >> he won't be the consensus candidate. >> all right. mike allen, mike thanks so much. >> thank you, mike. >> have a good week. >> i'm told we'll have some of
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rick perry's greatest hits coming up later in the show. >> do you promise? >> news you can't use? can you beat yesterday? >> no. can you bring back some of the pastor. >> let's cue up the tape of the pastor. >> and maybe there's some more. there's got to be more. that guy didn't stop at one minute. no. >> smoky and the bandit style outtakes, director's cut of that one. >> coming up next rex ryan has had a busy offseason. how he's testing his new slim physique in europe. >> well now. >> sports is next. [ male announcer ] man wasn't supposed to drive on water.
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time for a little sports. the home run derby candidates have been named. robinson canoe chose prince fielder and david wright. selected bryce harper, carlos gonzalez and michael cuddyer. takes place next week. great finish in the ninth innings of the reds/brewers game. joey votto representing the go-ahead run at the plate and then this happened. >> and votto lifts it into the air, centerfield, gomez, at the wall. gomes leaps and he makes the
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catch! a game saber. >> wow. game saving catch. carlos gomes ends the game. unbelievable play. votto can't believe it. starts arguing. wants to see the ball. it's in there. gomes shows him the ball. brewers win in dramatic fashion, 4-3. across the ocean to spain where thousands of people are taking part as they do every year in the running of the bulls in pamplona. today day three only minor injuries reported. there is a familiar face in the crowd spotted by you eagle eyed folks on-line. if you look very closely, look there, if you live in the new york area you know who that is. the jets head coach, rex ryan, running with the bulls. >> okay. >> enjoying his offseason with excitement. let's hope he makes it out of there for the sake -- >> i'm not sure the jets can take another hit. we need them. by the way the mets game last night ended at 3:45 a.m. local
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time. less than three hours ago. >> not local time. >> 4-3, 16 innings. >> 3:45. >> home game? >> oh, no it wasn't a home game. you know what i'm saying. it ended in san francisco but it ended late. >> between ambien and caffeine. >> coming up next, mika's must-read opinion pages. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. you know what i'm saying. ♪
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the ones getting involved and staying engaged. they're not afraid to question the path they're on. because the one question they never want to ask is "how did i end up here?" i started schwab for those people. people who want to take ownership of their investments, like they do in every other aspect of their lives. mhandle more than 165 billionl letters and packages a year. that's about 34 million pounds of mail every day. ever wonder what this costs you as a taxpayer? millions? tens of millions? hundreds of millions? not a single cent. the united states postal service doesn't run on your tax dollars. it's funded solely by stamps and postage. brought to you by the men and women of the american postal worker's union.
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time for the must-read opinion pages at 44 past the hour. let's go to the "new york times." frank bruni writes sex in the sorriest polls. obviously about eliot spitzer who will be our guest on
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"morning joe." already there's chatter about whose infidelities are more forgivable, spitzer's which are arguably a crime, weiner's which were creepier. this misses a crucial point. both men fell as speak tack colorly as they did not -- because they got caught with their pants down. but because none of their colleagues liked them much even with their pants pup thp accident clinton's reservoirs of charm or goodwill to tap. spitzer though an effective attorney general was shaping up to be a self-righteous, self-defeating disaster of a governor and weiner was a sound bite and a makeup kit in search of the nearest camera. wow. few people had a huge stake or interest in propping either of them in doing damage control. that's a good point, willie, especially because, you know, a lot of washington and politics is about leveraging relationships and making sure that you have a reservoir of goodwill and none of them had it ultimately when the clips were down. >> they were standing there alone at the end, both were.
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sam stein, you cover washington up close, particularly in the case of anthony weiner, he's a tough guy, sharp elbows, maybe not the most popular guy in congress. is this a fair assessment of who he is and why he fell? >> i think so. i mean anthony weiner is an interesting case. obviously he was more of a showman than a legislature. but that doesn't mean he can't be a decent mayor. and you know, in each of these cases i think yes, each of these men have personal failings. the question that everyone is going to ask when they go into the polling booth is, are they right for the job? and, you know, joe's hinted at this and i feel the same way, which is that in eliot spitzer's case i think the new york city comptroller job is a decent fit for him. >> a great fit. >> take a position a lot overlooked and make night a fiscal -- make it into a fiscal watchdog for the city. he was not a very good mayor. he did not get along well with the state government. he couldn't build alliances. he took a vast, you know,
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popularity and diminished it. the new york city comptroller position is much more autonom s autonomous, akin to the attorney general's office he occupied successfully. when voters cast their ballots whether for anthony weiner or eliot spitzer or anyone else, they're going to ask is this person the right fit for the position they're running for. >> at the end of the day, the question is can you do the job or not? look at these two scandals and you can say anthony weiner scandal and you say it all the time is not as serious as eliot spitzer's scandal, that's fine. they're both shamed in the public. both in the tabloids. both driven from office. that's over. >> yeah. >> now there's a new question that's going to be asked, mark halperin. and the question is, are they up to the job? you just had sam talking about how anthony weiner was more of a showman and that's also frank bruni talks about it in his op-ed. is this guy really going to be able to run the toughest city in
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america if he was a showman, if he wasn't a legislature, if he didn't know how to make things happen in washington, d.c.? a lot of people in the city are going to be asking that question. whereas eliot spitzer, mark halperin, the guy was not good in albany when he had to deal with a lot of different people, but when he was a.g., when he was basically a one-man band he was fantastic, at least when it comes to effectiveness. he did a lot of things he shouldn't have done. he dedestroyed a lot of lives. he went way over the line. he was also very effective in standing up to wall street. but as comptroller of new york city, are you kidding me ? if a taxpayer in new york, the guy is going to protect my money? i'm a resident of the city and i think all americans care about new york. this is a tough city to govern. we're about to lose a mayor who has not been perfect but has been able, big enough, to manage the city, to run the city, to
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keep the city safe, and prosperous and moving forward, and look, there's a real question right now. none of the people running for mayor i think have proven they're up to the job yet and i think if you think about the future of the city, a lot of people in the city who are powerful don't want eliot spitzer but this city will need at lot of leadership and you can see some people being attracted to the notion as you said joe, of having a strong comptroller and a mayor who can maybe work together to equal the kind of leadership we've seen with the last two mayors, again not perfect mayors but strong leaders which is what the city requires. >> i don't know if these opinions fall along gender lines. before we go to break i will say what -- and i got a lot of response on twitter for some comments i made about anthony weiner yesterday and there were good points made. i mean he showed incredibly poor judgment, he was sexing young women, may not be against the law but it was incredibly poor judgment and then lied about it. he needs to go on camera and talk about what he did, why he did it, and why he's better now
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if he is and why he thinks he deserves to be running for office again and until we hear from him, i really -- i'm sorry, i don't know why anybody would listen to a word he has to say. as far as eliot spitzer is concerned i'm glad he's coming in. but he will be asked questions and he has to address it. he has to -- he broke the law. why can we just wash that away and continue the conversation because he'll protect our money? that's ridiculous. >> we're not saying -- >> there are better options. why are we left with these being our best bad choices? i mean this is exactly what most people -- people watching are probably wondering two things. why do i care about who runs new york city and why is this the best worst option? people hate politics as it is. i don't think politicians have to wrap up their private lives with a bow, but are these two the best we can do? >> by the way, nobody is perfect either. i want to hear from them. i'm not sitting here judging. i just want to hear. i want to hear the whole story. eliot spitzer joins us on set
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later this morning. also christine quinn on her race against anthony weiner for mayor of new york city, coming on camera and talking to us. coming up the very best of texas governor rick perry. willie's news you can't use. can he top yesterday? i'm skeptical. keep it right here on "morning joe." looked nice? soft would be great, but we really just need "kid-proof." softsprings got both, let me show you. right over here. here, feel this. wow, that's nice. wow.
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don't go to sleep while i'm talking. hey, hey, hey, don't you lay your head back.
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i'm important. i'm somebody. you might do your english teacher that way, but i'm not teaching english. i'm teaching eternal life here. where have you been, mr. underwood? i noticed on the calendar i'm supposed to marry you all? what makes you think i would marry you? you're one of the sorriest church memberrs i have. you're not worth 15 cents. >> just for you, mika. a little more. >> thank you. >> of oklahoma pastor jim standard at the emanuel baptist church back by popular demand. we showed you yesterday. mika wanted more and she got it. >> what happened? >> he canceled the guy's wedding. said he wasn't worth 15 cents. if you're not paying attention he's going to come from behind the lectern and call you out. >> is he booked on the show? >> can we have him on? >> he would be good. >> and the greatest of these is love. this is -- he is a first corinthians man from bay whac-- back. >> i would like him on the show. >> not if you were mr. underwood
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or whoever he was talking to. >> he was controlling that audience with an iron fist. >> we talked about rick perry announcing he's not going to run for re-election in texas and perhaps run for president in 2016. we thought this a good time to look back at his run in 2012. ♪ ♪ today has been awesome, girl. >> if they print any more money over there in washington, the gold is going to be good and it's like, live free or die, victory or death, bring it. force the granite state to expand your tax footprint. you know what i mean?
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it's three agencies of government when i get there that are gone, commerce, education and the -- weight the third one there, let's see. the third agency of government i would do away with education, the -- commerce. and let's see. i can't. the third one i can't. sorry. oops. ♪ >> is it the mitt romney that was on the side of against the second amendment before he was for the second amendment? >> it was actually the reason that we fought the revolution and the 16th century. >> i grew up on a farm. i grew up -- i grew up on a farm. >> on a farm. there you go. rick perry, ladies and gentlemen. >> some things you can work with. >> that isn't one of them. >> oh. >> willie! >> coming up next --
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>> willie! you have let me down. where's the bad lip syncing? >> oh. >> oh. >> yeah. >> we didn't -- >> that's the point, joe. we didn't need it. >> oh, no. you always need it. what is it? don't forget the what? >> something for the gas jets. >> come on. >> eugene robinson joins us. plus a live report from san francisco next. >> don't forget the gas. ely for its traffic, congestion, for it's smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. since aflac is helping with his expenses while he can't work, he can focus on his recovery. he doesn't have to worry so much about his mortgage, groceries, or even gas bills. kick! kick...
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attorney general, as an assistant district attorney, as a governor, and say, this guy understood the public interest and that is what i'm looking for. >> all right. haze look at new york city at 7:00 in the morning on the east coast. welcome back to "morning joe." mark halperin and nicolle wallace are still with us along with sam stein in washington. joining us from washington as well, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the "washington post" and msnbc political analyst eugene robinson. good to have you all on board this hour. joe, we have a lot going on. we have christine quinn running for mayor of new york city in the next block, next hour. we heard a sound bite from eliot spitzer saying he wants to be heard. he will be joining us here as well. we'll have a lot of questions for him. i look forward to talking to him. >> a lot to talk about. boy, new york politics, there is nothing, nothing like new york city politics. >> nothing like it. >> you saw that of course in the shot there. hey, we have gene robinson,
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obviously. gene, you wrote a column, you wrote a column about what's going on in egypt. let's get to that in a second. but i know that you shared a lot of the reservations i had about afghanistan four years ago when you hear the president saying we may take all the troops out by next year, like me, that's good news, but also a tinge of tragedy it's taken four years to realize that karzai is not a good partner. >> yeah. i thought this was pretty clear a while ago that karzai was, you know, i think the term of art for it is a flake who was -- i mean, and his government is corrupt and we're giving them satchels full of cia cash to keep the right people paid off and yet he's still not cooperating with u.s. interests in the country. it was time to go a while ago.
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certainly time to go now. it is tragic it took this long to get to the point where we knew we were going to get to. >> all along. that's a great tragedy. we knew, mika, we were going to get here. when people came on our show and i go back to richard holbrooke and others, they would tell us one thing on the air and then they would get off the air and they would shrug their shoulders or throw their hands in the air. i remember richard specifically having a very heated conversation and acting like we were all out of our minds away from the table and as soon as the cameras turned off, his shoulders slumped and you knew. so many other people have been telling us for years, afghanistan is not going to work. car ziz not a reliable -- karzai is not a reliable partner. they were going out saying the right words but none believed it. >> there were so many different reasons in terms of why it wasn't going to work and like egypt, it was a lot of different bad options that president obama
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was facing when he took it on. this is eugene's latest column entitled "egypt's dark future." you write in part this, what's happening in egypt is not a second revolution or a correctionion to the first. it's a cue de ta that puts the military in command during it was during the reign of hosni mubarak. so much for the arab spring in the region's most populace country. and judging by the reaction in washington and other capitals the prevailing sentiment about egypt seems to be that some people just can't be allowed to govern themselves. but plenty of historical evidence suggests that the military's values probably derived from self-interest and that its vision of the future closely resembles the autocratic past. the multitudes of tahrir square should try ousting the generals next time and then we'll see who's right.
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gene, it's so complicated that it leaves the united states trying not to use the word coup. >> yeah. i understand why they don't want to use the word coup. >> i do too. >> they want to preserve the option of using the $1.5 billion in aid as a lever to try to get the new government such as it is to do the right thing. whatever the right thing might be. that's kind of the problem. the new military backed government, which is really a military government, is going to have to -- it's going to repress the muslim brotherhood in some way that's going to cause the muslim brotherhood either to go underground or to bide its time or whatever but to harbor the deep resentments about what happened to morsi, about what happened yesterday with the 51 protesters who were wilkilled w will become instant martyrs. i fear that a cycle is starting
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in egypt or restarting in egypt that could be worse than anything we've seen in that country in a long, long time. i'm not optimistic about the future now that this coup has taken place. >> mark halperin, morsi may have been a bad president but put yourself in the shoes for a moment of the muslim brotherhood. you democratically elected a person then removed by the military by force and now that same military who said we want to bring everybody in, have political reconciliation, is now taking to the streets and shot dead 51 of your people. how do you get to reconciliation from that moment? >> as we talked about earlier, asking them to continue to participate in the electoral process a very tough thing to do. this is -- when the arab spring started, when president bush began to say we're going to work to try to help bring back democracy in the region, we knew the u.s. government knew a lot of these places, governments would get elected that we didn't
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like. the egyptian government was under performing. the economy was bad. not a lot of security. people were unhappy. but the solution for that ideally is not an overthrow with the military. the solution is, another election. this again is a bad situation. the administration's finessing it as best they can and i think as sam said earlier, it's hard to see this getting better any time soon, but as i said also, i think you got to have sympathy for the american government. it's walking a line, security is paramount and stability and unfortunately stability now means supporting what is let's say what it is, a coup of an elected government. >> joe? >> you know, nicolle wallace, earlier today somebody said that karzai was not thomas jefferson. well, morsi, not george washington. we're sitting around here and i know that gene, this is not a knock at gene because i share a lot of gene's same concerns. i mean this is a terrible option, but the white house and
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gene said it himself, have a lot of it terrible options. morsi was a terrible leader. he was not george washington. he declared himself supreme over the judiciary. the guy was working towards a one-person, one-coalition, one-party government. and so the obama administration, time and time and time again, sent morsi warnings. you have to work with the opposition. and they did this for months. even leading up to the overthrow, if that's what we're going to call it, or the coup if that's what we're going to call it, and morsi time and time again snatched what would you say, snatched defeat from the jaws of victory. i mean he did everything wrong he could possibly do. >> right. >> to lead to this terrible conclusion. so while we're sitting here talking about what a horrible
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outcome it is, and it is a horrible outcome, a lot of the burden, a lot of the responsibility lands at the feet of morsi. "the new york times" quoted members of the muslim brotherhood that said if i weren't a member of the muslim brotherhood i would think this guy was trying to set himself up as dictator. >> sam made the good point earlier that morsi is going to be the one to watch and what he does, whether he throws his weight behind some semblance of stability will tell us about whether his loyalties lie with egypt or his political ambitions. the critique of what the obama administration has done and whether it's fair or not, it's starting to be shared by some commentators is that we did not monitor or engage ourselves in the building of a state. that we did not insist -- we keep talking ability the fact that we won't call it a coup because of the aid we give them. that aid could have been used as
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a leverage to ensure that some processes were in place, there was the establishment of a state, that there were basic institutions of democracy, the judiciary was set up and independent. there will be a critique of the obama administration's handling that whether you agree with it or not, i think will be talked about and batted around in the coming days. >> one other critique -- >> an election took place in egypt. at some point you have to let egyptians choose their own fate and that's what happened a year ago. and no amount of lever pulling or influence peddling by the united states could change the fact that more people voted for morsi than they didn't. and you know -- >> i'm not saying that, sam. our ambassador to egypt was intimately involved up to i think five days ago. we sat here the morning before the coup and our ambassador to egypt was intimately involved behind the scenes in making the point you just made, sam, this is a democratically elected
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leader. we do have influence and i think there will be a critique and it may be a fair one we were not involved enough after the election, after the democratic election, of morsi, in making sure that some of these checks and balances were put into place as they developed their first democracy in a very long time. we do that all over the world. >> nicole, as you know, i mean what ambassadors do is work with the government. ambassadors don't go in and try to overthrow governments. that's not how they see their job and that's not how we de fine their job. i don't blame the ambassador. if there's a critique i think it's one that the administration and congress and all of us may share and it is that we didn't have a big enough lever in egypt to influence events. there are other outside countries that have much more influence at the moment than we do because the saudis and the uae, they're providing aid to
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the military side, the ka tarries are providing aid to the muslim brother hood side and a lot more money than we're giving them, frankly, so in a sense we're kind of in a back seat. >> we want to get to the latest on the catastrophic crash of asiana flight 214 where the investigation is focused on the crew and why the pilots came in for landing so far slower than their target speed. tom costello covers aviation for nbc news and joins us live from san francisco with the latest on this story. tom? >> hi, mika. good morning. the ntsb has interviewed two of the four pilots on board this aircraft including the pilot who was at the controls. the pilot who was just gaining his 777 experience as well as we believe the pilot who was checking him out. the ntsb wants to know a bunch of things about the three days prior to the crash. how much sleep did these crew members get? how much duty time did they have? was anybody sick? anybody on any medication? anybody distracted for any
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reason? we're hearing from rescuers and a flight attendant about those terrifying moments on saturday. rarely do crash investigators get to see the actual violent moments of a plane crash and the immediate aftermath as the emergency chutes deploy and panicked passengers run for their lives. as airport fire/rescue crews began attacking the fire with foam city fire crews were coming behind them to help. >> at that point i raised it to a third alarm and declared a red ale alert. >> reporter: red alert means mass casualties. lu tenant chrissy hammonds was inside the plane, fight the fires and search for victims. >> we had somebody that was partially trapped. as it turns out there was a small person stuck between the seats. >> reporter: police officer jim cunningham also ran into the burning plane to help. >> people all over the runway, injured, hurt. at the other end way far away
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from the plane the tail and stuff, people down there too. >> reporter: on board a flight attendant was the last to leave the burning plane. one of the slides had opened inside the plane trapping another crew member. >> translator: my brain was very clear and i planned what i had to do immediately. actually, i was not thinking, but acting. as soon as i heard emergency escape, i conducted the evacuation. >> reporter: meanwhile, ntsb investigators have been combing through the debris field and interviewing the four pilot crew trying to learn why the 777 slowed down to stall speed in the final 30 seconds of flight. >> about three seconds prior to impact, the flight data recorder recorded its lowest speed of 103 knots. >> reporter: the plane should have been flying at 137 knots at least. the pilot at the controls was very experienced on other planes, but this was his first landing at san francisco in a 777.
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how did he and the captain checking him out on the flight allow their air speed to fall so low? >> we call this getting behind the airplane where the flying pilot may have been overwhelmed or have been tasked saturated and that the -- he lost the big picture. >> reporter: investigators are hoping their interviews will answer some critical questions. one other question that investigators will be looking at, whether cultural factors were at play here. you had two experienced pilots in the cockpit. is it possible that they were afraid to raise concerns with each other out of concern that they would be speaking out of turn, out of the concern that they were not showing enough deference. that's the kind of thing the ntsb wants to get to the bottom of. that has been a problem in previous crashes. guys, back to you. >> all right. tom costello, thanks very much. sam stein, thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks. >> eugene robinson, stay with us. up next, christine quinn has her eye on the mayor's mansion in new york city. there's a crowded field of contenders. we'll talk big apple politics in
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you lied at the time to constituents and to journalists and to your wife. so why should anyone trust you now? >> that's a fair question, and i don't think that we should talk much longer before i apologize. i've apologized a lot to my wife and doing it probably the rest of my life, but i owe an apology to my constituents as well. they put trust in me and there were people who believe in a lot of the same things i did, who put their support in me and when i was fighting for national health care they were there cheering me on. all i'm asking is just take a second look and give me a second chance. i know i have a lot of work to do with a lot of people. >> that was new york mayoral candidate anthony weiner asking for forgiveness as he seeks a return to public office.
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joining us now, the speaker of the new york city council and democratic candidate for mayor of new york city, christine quinn, joins the table this morning. welcome to the show. >> thank you very much. >> good to have you on board. it's interesting, one of the opinion pieces this morning talks about weiner seeking the mayoral spot in new york city and that's a huge, huge jump from the job he had and it's asking the voters for a lot compared to what eliot spitzer is doing which is trying to take a step back to gain trust again. but now we look at you and given the landscape of these guys, and i want to bring up the latest cue poll we have which shows kind of a dead heat between you and anthony weiner. what do you make of that, given the fact that you've been serving the city of new york and you've been in the fray, working hard for the people, and as far as i've heard you haven't had any scandal attached to your name that involves you lying to the voters? >> the polls will go up and down. when someone who comes in that is kind of a celebrity factor if
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you will, that can shake things up. i'm very confident as we move forward now into the thick of the race, people are really going to begin to look at our records. and the question here really and there's a lot of conversation in the past day or so second chances. we all thick think people deserve second chances. none of us are perfect. one, you need to earn them and then two, we need to really look at what people were doing before their fall from grace. if you compare anthony weiner's record, he passed one bill in congress and it was a bill that was clearly at the request of the campaign donor. >> what's yours? >> my record is incredibly broad and deep. quite frankly bigger than anybody else's running for mayor. passed eight balanced on time budgets, saved the jobs of 4100 school teachers when the mayor threatened to lay them off. kept every firehouse and library open during the recession. few other cities can say that. i passed more legislation to protect new york city's tenants and three quarters of our city are renters.
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that's a very important thing. passed legislation that has improved the quality of our housing and expanded housing and come september, kindergarten will be mandatory in new york city because of legislation that i got passed in albany. those are real issues that affect people's lives and have made this city a better place. and that's what people need in a mayor. somebody with a record who's gotten things done who they know can get things done because of what they've done. >> let me throw a wild one at you to see how you do here. what do you think about the stop and frisk policy in new york city and the complaints that civil rights are being violated and as a sort of argument to make the city safer we're losing our sense of justice? >> i would not get rid of the stop and frisk practice but it has gotten out of control. we have had at its peak 700,000 stops, single digits of those led to arrests or guns or any significant contraband. clearly that level was not being done in a constitutionally sound
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way and that concern is why a couple weeks ago we passed legislation in the city council that will put independent monitoring over the police department to look at its policies and practices moving forward. and it's important to note, crime, because of the good work of ray and the police department -- >> that's the argument. crime has gone down in a big way compared to chicago. >> stops have gone down in the past two quarters as by the hundreds of thousands as has crime. the facts show you did not need stops at that level to keep the city safe. it has torn communities and police apart and that's a danger to long-term public safety also. >> willie geist? >> speaker quinn, if you go out in the streets as you laid out your record the people of new york city know who you are, watched you work for years. a lot will say that they're upset about the fact that you were on the city council that voted to approve a third term for mayor bloomberg, in effect overturning the will of the people. and that sticks in the crawl of a lot of people.
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how do you answer that criticism that you should not have awarded a third term to may other bloomberg? >> you know, when some folks raise that, what i say is what the facts were. i made a decision what i thought was the right one for the city at that time to give the voters a choice of who they wanted to keep and didn't. i made that decision because i thought it was right for the city. knowing there would be political consequences. that's what we want in leader, somebody who makes a decision even if there's political consequences and i took those four years and worked with my colleagues and got things done for new yorkers. you know, at a time when so many other legislative bodies -- look at congress. over those four years, ground to a halt, didn't get things done, we got things done. you know, just two or three weeks ago, when i passed my eighth balanced on time budget, we faced the effects of sequestration. we had huge cuts to our housing authority which could have led to layoffs, closures of senior centers and youth centers. unlike washington i brought my colleagues together with the
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mayor, we saved those jobs, kept the centers open. i'm proud of what i've done in this term and quite frankly it's a model for other governments in washington about how they need to focus on delivering results for the people they serve. >> did you buckle to pressure, as a lot of people have said, from mayor bloomberg who said listen, christine, i need a third term, got to get this done for me? >> i have never been a supporter of term limits. i did not buckle to pressure. i did what i thought was right for the city and stand by that decision. >> tough job you're trying to have. >> it is. >> if you get elected what are the special interest groups, the powerful interests, that would oppose your agenda? >> i think there will be different people that agree with me -- >> name some specific groups you think would fight you, would spend money, try to rally against you if you were elected that you would have to stand up to? >> let me say that but one thing you have to remember is the person who disagrees with you today, could be your ally tomorrow. there's very few issues where there's clear angels and devils and however you conduct yourself you have to remember that.
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we may disagree today but tomorrow try to find something to agree on. who knows. i've been able on the issue of housing to bring the tenant interest of the city and the land lorde lobby together at times. that's how we passed the safe housing law. when i passed a law that gives tenants the first time ever the power to take a land lorde to court who is harassing them for harassment i couldn't get the landlord lobby. they sued me and i won. and now a tenant who is being willfully harassed by their landlord has standing in court. i'll agree when i can but not going to compromise my core values for the interest of new yorkers whoever disagree with me. not going to do it. >> have you asked mayor bloomberg for endorsement. >> i have not. >> i wonder where he's going to go with that. i would think he would endorse you. we'll see. >> we'll see. >> great to meet you. >> thank you for coming on the show. best of luck to you. >> thank you very much. >> is it sometimes frustrating to see what gets press? because some people argue that
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any press is better than no press? >> you know, page 2 of "the new york post" has my reform of the restaurant rating system. let's look at that. >> oh. >> a horrendous picture. >> look at this picture. >> do you ever eat in restaurants that bet a "b"? >> yes. i don't think -- i ate once accidentally in a "c." try not to. >> seriously "new york post." >> that's not right. >> is that not right. okay. i'm looking at you. you do not look like that. you're very elegant and put together. >> thank you very much. >> it's a positive story. the picture doesn't match. >> and it's a balance of the interests of consumers with small businesses. we really brought everybody to the table and found a way to reduce fines on small businesses. >> that's great. >> but still has a system that has integrity. >> what about health? do you agree with the mayor's efforts to try to, sorry, but like create a nanny state here? i actually did. >> some some i agree with some i don't. i put out a proposal for
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children's meals in chain restaurants to have those meet usda standards. we found in some establishments they had quadruple the saturated fat in a child's meal that the usda would allow in a school lunch. >> i want you back to talk about that. that's a big issue in new york city. thank you very much. great to meet you. more on new york politics with former governor eliot spitzer running for city comptroller. up next an economic reality check. 21 years in the making. the producers of a frontline documentary update the stories of two american families who since 1992 have opened their lives to show the struggle of trying to make it in the middle class. that's next when "morning joe" comes right back.
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. once upon a time when people got your age and you're much younger than i am, almost 60, they started thinking seriously about retiring but you're not. >> i can't do that because the reason is, you can't stay on the job long enough to retire. you know, every job i have i worked seven years, the place closed down. somewhere else another five years, they lay you off and they
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shut down. all the years i've been working, i could have retired right now if you stayed at one job. >> wow. that was a clip from "frontline's" documentary "two american families" which follows two american families and their middle-class struggles. joining us now the producers of the programs tom and kathy and it's great to have you on. you followed them over a long period of time. >> we met them in 1991. >> wow. >> in 1991. what did you learn about the plight of the middle class in america, the challenges and about these families specifically that give us a sense of where we're going? >> when we first started researching the story in 1991 our working thesis was that technology was coming to change all of our lives an it was going to create all this free time and what were we going to do with our leisure? >> that was our assignment. >> really? >> american workers, technology will allow us to work fewer hours. >> wow. >> more krivically involved, how is that going to change the work
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place and our communities and -- >> as soon as we -- >> didn't take us long that was never going to happen. >> the real story was that jobs were going away and new jobs might require more training, but they were going to pay less. and we really saw this downward pressure on wages, way back in the early '90s and it's just gone down and down and down since. >> there's so many reasons why a look at this documentary is important. joe joins us. joe, jump in. >> i remember back in 1991, you guys talk about when you first started looking into this, how technology was going to change the lives of americans. bill clinton was campaigning, walking through the snows of new hampshire talking about workers that were left, going to be left behind, and that just continues and the news keeps getting worse. i've seen statistics that if our technology was static from 1992 forward, 20 million more people
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would be working today. these are the people that are being left behind. >> and this is the real story of their lives. this is a film where you watch kids grow up before your eyes and you watch people change and get older and go through what it's like living in the new american economy. so much of the conversation about working people in america takes place way above their heads. >> yeah, right. >> some people think this and some people think that. >> it gets reduced to partisan politics. to these families that have been through democratic and republican administrations they continue to suffer. >> this is not partisan politics. >> they could care less about the last recession. this is not about -- this is something that's been long term. >> tectonic. >> yeah. it started really in the -- >> you can speak to this and i'm sure bill moyer speaks to it, i'm sure the documentary speaks to it, that we -- every four years we have politicians, actually every two years, how they're going to make the economy better. >> right. >> we're talking about the fact
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that average wages in america have gone down consistently since 1973. >> yeah, correct. >> we are talking about a generational shift that one election, one party, one leader can't even touch, right? >> seems to be that way. i mean, each, with every time we go back to milwaukee we hear that it's important to retrain and we all get behind retraining. it's important to reduce taxes. it's important to do one thing or another and it seems that day in and day out, these families' lives aren't necessarily improving with any of the policy prescriptions that we've heard so far. >> and if you watch our film you'll see these people, be they do retrain. >> oh, yeah. >> everything you're supposed to do. they go back to school. they get a certificate for this or learn how to do that. they do get new jobs. it's just that the problem is, the jobs don't pay very much. >> right. our families are amazing. >> very hard to get ahead. >> terry newman, just a picture on the screen, right now she's
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probably getting off of work. i mean he's 49 years old. she's raised three children and she's been through a number
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we were just trying to show in documentary fashion what good americans are who are working hard, doing what they're supposed to be doing, following all the rules. >> playing by the rules. >> playing by the rules. >> yeah. >> that's it. >> i think the families haven't given up hope. you see claude, 60 years old. gets up at 4:00 or 5:00 in the morning to empty garbage throughout the city. these people are doing everything they can possibly do to hold on. so i don't think we should give up on them.
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i think we should find something. >> and claude stanley does that with a smile on his face and commitment to his family and commitment to his country. he does not give up. >> everyone should take a look at "frontline's" two american families premiering tonight at 10:00 on pbs stations. thank you so much for being on the show. it's really nice to meet you. >> the same. >> we have a friend in common which we discovered this morning. up next, bin laden's secret life. what new documents reveal about the terror leader's years in hiding. "morning joe" will be right back. . ♪
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bin laden but that's just the beginning of the revelations. joining us now from the white house, nbc news white house correspondent peter alexander with more on this. peter. >> good morning to you. this is really a damming 337-page independent pakistani report that was first obtained by all jazeera and blames osama bin laden's ability to live in that country undetected for nine years on what you described gross incompetence by pakistan's security forces. the scathing new report commissioned by pakistan after the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden concluded the al qaeda leader didn't hide in mountain caves but moved freely between six addresses in pakistan from 2002 to 2011. the last six years in that abbottbad compound barely a half mile from the pakistan military academy. the report notes once the car he was riding in was even stopped for speeding but the police officer let the vehicle go. the pakistani commission's report is strikingly honest and brutal, blasting the country's
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civilian and military leadership. calling the episode a national disaster. it appears to be a story of complacency, ignorance, negligence, incompetence and irresponsibility and possibly worse. >> the report shows that the civilian and military authorities were asleep at the wheel. they failed to do their duty, failed to coordinate against the militants and the terrorists inside their own country. >> reporter: michael leiter, then national counterterrorism director was in the situation room the night of the raid. >> frankly i thought the pakistanis were surprised by this and given the weakness of their intelligence system in many ways it was not terribly surprising to me they didn't know he was there. >> reporter: also revealed new details about bin laden's secret life. to avoid detection he shaved his beard, at times wore a cowboy hat around the compound to prevent being spotted from above. bin laden was not fond of possessions owning three outfits for summer and winter.
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even his diet, he liked chocolate with an apple. all the gritty details in this report about that leak. nbc news reached out to a pakistani military official early this morning who told us the following, we are going to find the leaker and joe and mika, be he said specifically, he's going to wish he was edward snowden living in an airport. >> all right. that's one way of putting it. nbc's peter alexander, thank you. joe? >> yeah. you know, mark halperin, i'm surprised by the frankness. really surprised by the frankness of the pakistani government. we've obviously been very critical through the years and of the pakistani government, but i think this is -- i mean, having this hard of a look, having them look at themselves in this way and this critical way, i think that's pretty significant? >> yeah. this report was done by some people from justices and police officials and people in theory and apparently in fact outside the government. i mean it's a great thing to
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have and uncharacteristic. i would like to say i would be optimistic it would lead to some kind of change rather than just a great set of facts an some criticism, but that optimism would probably be misplaced. >> you know, nicole, diplomatically, though, this is -- i think it's good for the united states, a lot of pakistanis very angry at the u.s. for that raid. here, though, is a pakistani -- people associated with pakistan, actually saying boy, we just did an absolutely terrible job. it was a catastrophe and we shoulder the blame. >> yeah. and you hope this is the straight story. i mean this is obviously the better scenario for pakistan and its future relations with our country than the alternative which is that they weren't asleep at the wheel, they were aware what was going on. so, you know, i hope that this is the straight story. i hope that -- we were watching it and mika and i were talking about how --
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>> incredulous. >> how incredibly frank it seems. but i wonder if it isn't so frank and meant to illicit the reaction it has from us and obviously again the alternative is -- >> you're calling me a doof because of my rick perry comments earlier. >> we're all sitting -- >> unwitting. >> if anyone would be a due fuss -- >> you bush people will not let anybody say anything nice ability rick perry. it makes me sad. >> he's a doofus. can we not say rick perry is a doofus on the program? >> no! he has been an incredibly successful governor of the republic of texas and has done more to bring jobs to that state than anybody in years. how's that? >> that's good. i think i'm going to sign you up for perry 2016. >> can we show the pastor again? okay. coming up, first it was house of cards and now netflix is back with a new highly-anticipated show rewriting the rules when it comes to sidestepping tv as we
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in here. i was somebody with a life i chose for myself. and now, now it's just about getting through the day without crying.
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and i'm scared. i'm still scared. i'm scared that i'm not myself in here, and i'm scared that i am. >> wow, that's powerful. that was a clip from netflix upcoming series, "orange is the new black." here with us the star of the show taylor shilling along with piper, who wrote a memoir about her time in prison which serves as inspiration for the show. wow. congratulations on being on netflix, which is the way of the future. i can't tell you it has changed the way -- i actually walk television again. >> that's saying a lot if mika is watching. >> i can't stick with the schedule i live but i can with netflix. lets start with the memoir arnold then get to the show. "orange is the new black" is
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based on your personal experience. you served time. tell us about it and what you wrote? >> well, mika, i went to prison in 2004 and served 13 months of a 15-month sentence. i walked through prison gates more than 10 years after committing the crime, which was money laundering. i was involved in a relationship with a -- you know, seductive and sophisticated older woman who was also involved in drug trafficking. i made a very serious mistake when i was 22. when i was 34, that's actually when i began doing my time. >> and the book served what purpose for you beyond building a future? obviously now it's become something that's exploding into a show and creating a financial future. but writing it, tell us about that. >> for me, the united states has the biggest prison population in the world, prison population in human history. i thought by telling my own
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story i could create a more complex sense of who is in prison and why they are there and what happens to them there, which is very different, in my experience, than most folks assume. >> and taylor, that scene sort of exemplifies exactly what you're saying, piper, the humanity, or debasing feeling of being behind bars and that confusion as to who you are and what's left of you on the other side is -- was seen in a 20-second clip. it's an incredible role. >> yeah. it's been a wonderful experience. that idea of having to be still and being behind bars and that sort of -- that unpeeling that happens when people are confined. it's been a really extraordinary thing to explore. >> tell us about the show. i so far love everything on netflix so far so i'm assuming i'm going to love this. what can we experience? what's the experience of "orange
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is the new black?" >> we have women on this show i don't think we see on television very often. they are women of all different shapes and sizes and colors and orientations. the creator of "weeds" has done an amazing job of letting us into their lives. they are finding things to relate to with women that we may otherwise have felt we were completely separate from. >> the show is a dromedy. people wonder that. the show rides this razor's edge between very, very serious themes, which are drawn from the book and very, very serious comedy. it's almost like life and almost a relief valve. the viewer is intent with this drama. then there's this moment of i can laugh for a second.
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>> do you think that's a woman's experience in prison. >> i think viewers would have a hard time coming to a show that was just straight drama about a prison setting. i think this will give folks lots and lots of reasons to watch and to stay. >> fascinating. you can catch "orange is the new black" starting this thursday on netflix. i look forward to it. i'm really glad to meet you both. congratulations. taylor shilling and piper herman. thank you very much. up next, updating the investigation into the deadly plane crash of asiana flight 214. new video that is giving investigators a rare view of a plane as it crashes. also, the president considers a new plan for exiting afghanistan. why every troop can be on his or her way out of the country. that's all straight ahead on "morning joe." members of the american postal worker's union handle more than 165 billion letters and packages a year.
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good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, we have nicolle wallace, mark halperin and in washington, d.c. senior political editor and white house correspondent for the "huffington post" -- i think calendar model in there as well -- sam stein. >> he's hot. he is hot. >> i guess that's a word that comes up with sam. don't you think, guys? >> that is.
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the guy is so hot. how hot is the guy? this guy is so hot he should run for comptroller of new york city. >> too nice. i'm not going to read them out loud. >> what do we have? >> don't say willie geist, what do we have? >> it's -- >> willie geist. >> i don't like that one. >> mika, hold up the newspaper. >> "new york post," sleazy does it. you can see the news there. >> the daily news has some pretty good headlines, too. >> we'll have eliot spitzer on the show today. i have no problem with that. you keep thinking -- we can actually ask him questions about all this. i think it's weird to have him on and not, which is what we did once. we'll do it the right way today. >> mika, it's not just the
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tabloids. "new york times" has editorial where they say eliot spitzer from the kardashian party. this is about his personal ambition as he's to leave us out of his personal journey to redemption. we begin with the catastrophic crash of asiana flight 214 where the investigation is focused on the crew and why the pilots came in for landing about 40 miles per hour slower than their target speed. nbc's tom costello reports. >> reporter: emergency chutes are seen deploying taken after the crash of flight 214. moments later passengers are seen running away from the burning aircraft as fire rescue crews pour foam on the fire and new video after the crash itself. after ripping off the tail on the seawall, the 777 seems to jump in the air and flip over before slamming to the ground. >> i thought before leaving the plane, i might proceed up and die. >> we got photos from the
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teenagers killed in the accident. investigators are looking whether one of them may have been hit by an arriving fire engine. on the ground ntsb investigators have been walking the length of the runway inspecting a scattered trail of debris. the landing gear from the fuselage. the plane itself. oxygen masks hanging, seats twisted and broken. >> the lower portion of the tail cone is in the rocks at the seawall. there was a significant piece of the tail of this aircraft that was in the water. >> we learned the pilot, new to flying the 777, and his training pilot allowed their air speed to drop well below the 137 knot target for landing. three seconds before the plane crashed, the plane was stalling at 103 knots, not a mistake you expect from veterans. >> there was a lack of interaction between the two pilots. the pilot that was actually manipulating the flight controls and a pilot who should be
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monitoring air speed and altitude and sync rate. >> the ntsb said it wasn't until four seconds before the crash there were any system warnings of a stall. investigators plan to interview the crew english and korean to ask what was happening in those fine seconds of flight, because both flights were senior, did each assume the other was monitoring speed and altitude. nbc news aviation analyst former captain john cox. >> what was the demeanor of the inner workings of the crew, how effective were they working as a team, that's a question we're going to have to have answered. >> u.s. troops are supposed to be out of afghanistan by the end of 2014, but now the president may be considering a speedier exit. "the new york times" reports president obama is considering moving up the withdrawal and not leaving a residual force behind, in large part because he has grown frustrated with afghan president hamid karzai. according to the paper the two leaders attended a video
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conference last month to smooth things over but it reportedly ended badly with the afghan president accusing the president of trying to negotiate peace with the taliban and doing that without him. joe, president obama, i think, running out of patience with the situation. >> yes. of course, there's so much to be concerned about here. of course neo-cons are going to be concerned we'll leave no troops there. i'm concerned, i know you are, all of us are concerned either taken four years to get to this point. we're essentially where we were four years ago. joe biden was there four years ago. i don't know if people remember, but mark halperin, there was that scene in 2008 where joe biden went over, met in afghanistan, met with karr issuing. he was still a senator then. he got up. he threw his napkin down, stormed away from the table.
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joe biden said then, privately and publicly to some people, we did not -- we'd never have a partner in karzai. it is painfully obvious to a lot of us for a long time, for joe biden as well. i think, though, this is -- i think at the end of the day, this is where the president wants to be with his legacy, that he ended the war in iraq. he got the troops out of afghanistan. i know congress is going to raise hell, but i think the american people would be with him if he did this, wouldn't they? >> if karzai had turned out to be thomas jefferson, this still would have been a very tough time. people on this program for years have been saying there's no way with someone so unreliable that this could work out. i'm sure i know the president has had suspicions about that, not just because the vice president has warned him and others have warned him but the president has had his suspicions. this is a horrible thing to have
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happened. the "times" story turned a lot of fence posts. there's a reason they had that story. whether they are trying to send a message to karzai to see if he can turn around, i don't know. it seems clear, whether there's a residual force or not, the direction this is headed is to have all american, if not all american troops out of there and lets hold our breath to see what happens then. >> nicolle wallace, the longest running war in american history, our men and women continue to die tragically in afghanistan. george w. bush is going to be judged harshly for a lot of decisions he made going into iraq. i suspect barack obama when given the choice to start moving out of afghanistan four years ago or tripling the number of troops is going to be held accountable as well. this is a story. this is a war that hasn't ended well. really, it's become the definition going in for one reason and stay for another.
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instead of trying to kill terrorists, you try to rebuild the country. that just didn't work out in afghanistan. it didn't work out in iraq. it was a failed experiment that cost us trillions and cost the lives of so many americans. >> well, and what really drives home how long this has gone on, a lot of us had the opportunity or privilege to visit college campuses. when you go talk to a class of 18 or 20 years old, have you to go back to 9/11 to explain why we're there in the first place and it really hits home how long we've been there. some republicans will say, why of course this war should end. i know that everyone in this program has been calling for that for years now. but there are a lot of republicans who urge that we work with and listen to the military commanders. of course once america leaves, any and all of our coalition partners will leave, too, and this country will hopefully, but
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likely fall into the hands and become a threat to the homeland again. >> all right. lets move on to egypt, the muslim brotherhood is calling for a national uprising, accusing the military of stealing last year's revolution by force. the call for action came just hours after an early morning attack on protesters near a military compound in cairo. egyptian health officials say at least 51 people died and more than 400 were injured in that attack. military officials say they were responding to a, quote, terrorist group trying to storm the building. meanwhile the country's interim president has announced a timetable to amend the constitution, establish a new parliament and elect a president. the new government is expected to be in place by early next year. white house officials say they are watching the situation in egypt closely but are not ready to call the military's action a coup. >> this is a complex situation. it is not in our interest to
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move unnecessarily quickly in making a determination like that, because we need to be mindful of our objective here, which is to assist the egyptian people in their transition to democracy. >> mark halperin and willie. the reason to not call it a coup has to do with money, obviously. it's not that the president is parsing words, correct? >> there's some requirements under the law. right now the united states is in a very tough position. we don't want to say you can overthrow democracy with a military coup. our closest ally in that country is the military. it was in the last changeover in government. there's extraordinary concern about stability in the region and israel security. >> call it a coup and you're even farther away. >> easy to criticize the administration. right now with no great choices, being for stability, trying to see if democracy can emerge is
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the best option. >> in cairo for us this morning, amin, good to see you. a really ugly day there yesterday. >> reporter: it was. it's kind of strange these days waking up in cairo and saying it's off to a good start when you don't have any casualties to report. that's the case today. the day you're talking about is one of the bloodiest egypt has seen in the past two years. as we were talking, more than 52 people were killed. not yet quite sure how it started. depending on who you ask you're getting two narratives. the military says it was guarding the republican guard headquarters, its soldiers came under attack, it was self-defense. relief footage showed assailants attacking positions. if you ask muslim brother looked supporters there, they say we were engaged in morning prayers as we have every day this week, staging a sit-in and they came under attack. one thing everyone is sure
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about, it was a very chaotic scene. now it has narrowed the confrontation between military and muslim brotherhood supporters. that has everyone concerned they will see a new wave of violence between these two organizations. the military who ousted the president and the brotherhood onhas been in the streets since it happened. >> how can there be political reconciliation, one that would include the muslim brotherhood, if people are being shot in the street. >> reporter: absolutely. that is the million dollar question, because the interim governor right now, doesn't have a prime minister, a cabinet, just a president. he's trying to convince the muslim brotherhood and islamists to come back into the political process. that in itself is a hard sell. you're trying to convince them first time around democracy didn't work, ousted, come back in the mix, we'll give it another shot. they aren't buying it. even if they win, they will be ousted again. people on the streets are extremely anxious and losing
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more confidence with the institutions, with the exception of the military. it's polarized egypt in a negative way. >> ask about a report that multiple staffers resigned from al jazeera egyptian channel saying it's biased in favor of the muslim brotherhood. what do you say about that? >> that's correct, 24 staffers resigned, over the last several months under the muslim brotherhood rule, al jazeera was not reporting what's on the street, not reporting both sides of the story. yesterday they resigned en masse. more importantly actually here in cairo at a press conference for military and police an al jazeera reporter forced out by other journalists, who felt the presence of that al jazeera reporter was not fair or not accurate. they forced that reporter to get
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up and leave the press conference. some are looking at it from the sense of politics but also an expression point of view and freedom of media, there are human rights activists expressing concern there's a crackdown against al jazeera and other slight channels. a lot happening on media wars as well. >> ayman in cairo. thanks so much. your thoughts on egypt here. it's hard to see how these groups come together when they are, in fact, being shot in the street by the military. >> it's a hot mess. there's very little chance of political reconciliation in the interim. i read a report this morning that the muslim brotherhood is rejecting the time line set forth by the interim president for new elections and a new constitution. you can't really blame them. what happens was egypt's first free elections were overturned by the military in a year. we can quibble all day about whether or not you want to call it a coup. at the end of the day it's deeply alienating to people who
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supported those elections. >> coming up, miami heat, ray allen is here. we'll talk about his long career in the nba and the next challenge that's taking him inside the halls of congress. up next former governor eliot spitzer standing by. he's looking to get back into politics five years after stepping down from office. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill. >> good morning to you, mika. our first threat of the hurricane season to the southeast u.s. coastline is possible as we go throughout the next five to seven days. this is tropical storm chantal, just went through barbados, heading for st. lucia. not a hurricane any time soon. the big question is, how strong will it be after it exits mountainous terrain of haiti and dominican republic. hurricane center thinks we could have a 60 miles an hour storm off the florida coast, close to hurricane strength by sunday or monday. that's this upcoming weekend
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into next week. these spaghetti lines show a potential path which would take it possibly somewhere near the southeast coastline. again, that would be early next week. today we're wondering about thunderstorms rolling into the great lakes and areas of northern plains from green bay to milwaukee, chicago, kansas city to omaha, you have a chance of strong storms with damaging winds and some large hail. we leave you with a shot of new york city, a sweaty, muggy new york city. it's been that way for a week. no changes coming any time soon. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. "i'm part of an american success story," "that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups,"
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welcome back to "morning joe." twenty past the hour. joining us on set, former governor of new york, now candidate for new york city comptroller eliot spitzer. welcome back to the show. >> it is great to be here. thank you for inviting me. >> thank you for coming and facing the cameras and questions. joe is with us as well. >> cameras may be easier. >> you're fine. i actually appreciate the opportunity. joe, can i go first? >> seriously, mika, i think everybody around this set knows you're going first. we're going to sit back. whatever is laboring you, just get it out of your mind so we can talk about policies, because we're concerned about the people of new york city. >> so joe already went first. >> he just did. we'll talk policy. i seriously want to know what you would like to do with this job.
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>> sure. >> but lets take it in priority. first of all, why did you decide to get back into politics, given everything. >> it's tough. >> have you seen the front page of the papers this morning? >> sure. i'm mystified by the focus and attention to that but put that aside because i want to answer your important question, which is why i want to get back in, what i want to do with the office, get back in. i believe in service. i believe in what i did as prosecutor, ada, attorney general, governor. the reforms we put in place, a lot of people didn't like it but i think the record historically will show we're right. whether it was capital markets, environment, low wage labor, even driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants, now the law of the land. things we did and proposed that were not timely but correct. i believe in those things will i'm ready to take the incoming missiles. they are coming at me. some of them are hitting. i understand. i've spent five years thinking, apologizing, i'm ready to ask for forgiveness.
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it's not easy. i'm ready to ask. >> so i think the focus on this, whether it's unfair on some of the newspapers that are prevalent here in new york city, which can be cruel, but the focus is out there because while in office, while in power, you lied, you broke the law on a number of levels. when it was revealed there were different things that were happening in your life that you weren't telling people about. what i want to know is what drove that poor judgment and why should we feel that wouldn't happen again? >> fair question. i'm not going to agree with every piece of your characterization. >> correct me, then. >> i'm going to answer your question, which is the important one, which is that i failed. i had flaws, made horrific judgments, was unfaithful to my family, the electorate. that's why he resign-- i resign. i held myself accountable.
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i stood up, looked into the camera and said i'm resigning. five years have gone by. in those five years i've reflected, thought, written, taught, a multitude of things, run our family business. i think after five years, lengthy period of time, can i go to the public and say, look at the totality of who i am. >> elliot, let me interject here. you've said twice you've reflected. you've reflected. what have been the results of your reflection? you obviously looked inward and looked at yourself. answer the question, what were the flaws that led you to break the law and break the public trust? >> i will put it this way,
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huberis is terminal. what i did was wrong, a consequence of huberis, failure, indulgence, inexplicable, unjustifiable, improper. >> agree with most of mika's characterizations about it. >> so arrogance -- when you're on the campaign trail. forget about if you're elected, if you're elected, are people going to see eliot spitzer, a one less arrogant, more reflective. >> hopefully i'll be more reflective. i'm not here to quibble about the characterizations about me. >> that was your characterization. i'm talking about emotional arrogan arrogance. i think on substantive issues, i won't say we're the only voice,
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certainly, but when you're one of few people standing up in 2001, '2, '3, '4, '5saying deep flaws in the markets. everybody says, no, you're completely wrong, the environment, issue after issue. it's at that point necessary to have the fortitude to stick to your principles. that's what i'm trying to make, the personal from the substantive. i'm running for office substantive jurisdiction. i'm running for an office very important to the city, requires understanding of capital mark, knows how to use them, participate in them. even though there's folks on wall street, i see it in the headlines, that don't look forward to dealing with me. i've been in that marketplace. i've run a family business of some magnitude. we're quite successful. i think i understand the capital markets and as a consequence how to participate. >> can i cut through this for a
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second? >> sure. >> as you know, i've actually said this position seems perfect for you and people shouldn't judge you by your past failures. i have to say, though, you're telling us things we already know about you. you're talking about your accomplishments. i don't know that's what we want to hear right now. we don't want you to throw yourself on your sword. it's not for us. i'm not your judge. the voters of new york city are your judge. i just want to break this down. you're saying there was a personal hubris that led to your fall. is that correct? >> absolutely. absolutely. >> if i'm a voting in new york city, and i'm not, but i have said you'd be perfect for this position regardless of your past. what do you say to that voter to tell them that personal hubris that maybe destroyed everything i built up my entire life and made me a laughingstock and hurt my family, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, how do you assure them that this second time around you've got that in check and you're not going to make the
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same mistakes in other areas. >> it's not only a fair question, an important question. the only answer, i'm here, acknowledging it, sitting here with mika. there's no question -- >> that's tough. >> it's not that tough. it's tougher in another context. >> it's tough. >> it's tougher to look your family in the eye. >> of course. >> that's tough. >> one more thing, and then i'll be quiet. >> i like it when you talk. >> what i've been saying to mika all along is he'll be great in this position, he held wall street accountable when nobody else was. you were overreaching but holding them accounting when nobody else was, especially '02. again, what do you say to voters, if i'm elected, i'm going to keep politicians honest. wait a second, who is going to keep him honest?
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we gave him our vote. we entrusted him with the most powerful position in new york state and you let us down. how are you going to be the gatekeeper, so to speak, when you let people down so badly before. >> eliot, if i can say for everybody here who has not failed in some way personally, that's ridiculous. i don't think we can judge. it's the law breaking. that's the trust. to pay for new yorkers to trust you to make sure the bills are paid and to take care of this job and to do it well, how do they trust, given the fact the law was broken. >> again, take a look at the totality of my life, my career, my personality and make that judgment and weigh in balance. that's why when i got into this and you asked, it's a tough decision. it was a tough decision. i knew the questions would be asked. they are being asked. all i can say to the public is look at the totality, what i've done, said, what i stand for and
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make a judgment. i have trusted the public's judgment whether as a low level d.a. trying a misdemeanor case to a jury or voter -- candidate asking the votes of the public. i will trust the public yes or no. >> so the -- how do i say this, the making of a successful politician often involves arrogance, involves a sense of confidence, involves an ego, involves an ability to withstand unbelievable strut any and beatings from all sorts of media. how do you keep your arrogance in check, if you actually fulfill this. >> come on this show once a month. i have a sense that would be a pretty good way to wither one's sense of self-importance and keep hubris in check. i don't say that mean. we laugh a little when i say that. that's part of it. you put yourself out like this,
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it does a lot to keep things in check, as it should. that's part of what media does. >> if you win this position, will you ever lie to the public once elected? >> no. no. >> never? >> no. >> mika asked you if the beginning how can people be confident there won't be a repeat of the behavior before you reflected. speak a little more about that. what does that mean? what is what you've done in the last five years convince people, reassure people it won't happen again? >> i've tried to do things that matter in a small and quiet way. that doesn't persuade people, that occurrence, but i've thought deeply and recognized i would need to answer these questions. look at the pain i've caused. >> but if you win, you will not really have paid -- you paid some price obviously, but you will not have had your public career ended. again, wouldn't that, to some extent, reinforce the notion that you could do what you want to do? >> i'm not quite sure. i think there has been a
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substantial price to be paid. i'll let others determine small, adequate or inadequate. resigning the governorship and then dealing with the aftermath of that and dealing with everything that has come from it is pretty significant. >> is there anything in a high office could do, involved law breaking, lying to the public, that you would consider as a voter disqualifying. if a person comes back, look what i've done in the last five years. >> sure. >> what? what would disqualify. >> i think there's a difference between private and public lives. i'm not the one to articulate this distinction at this point. i'm in a uniquely bad position to articulate it. there is a divide there we do want to think about at a certain point of time. >> lying as the governor of new york does not disqualify you. >> depends about what. i think we know politicians disembell on substantive and
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probably personal issues as well. so a question of where, when, how, and on what issue. i think there's slightly greater subtlety to this in terms of the art of governance and how you can determine whether what people has done disqualifies them. >> one more. is an elected official, governor of new york, controller of new york, lying about his or her personal life when asked about it in a public capacity, that's fine? >> i didn't say it was fine. you asked if it was disqualifying. we're going down a path where it requires more time to pars out the boundary between public and private. people lie about taxes, not having paid their taxes. i think that is -- >> you lied about illegal activity. >> i lied about personal sexual activity, yes. i did that. i'm not diminishing that. >> you weren't lying about a consensual affair but illegal activity. >> that's correct. >> you're saying lying about illegal activity does not
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disqualify. >> i will let the public make the determination. >> when the public makes this determination, tell me why you chose this job to run for and what you would want to do with it? >> because i think the skills i've demonstrated in terms of capital market, in terms of understanding finance, in terms of understanding budget, understanding city government are applicable to this position, and i think that what i want to do with it is use the jurisdiction that is there, which relates to capital markets, pensions, ensure they are safe, invested well, get the returns we needed. audits, how many paper clips delivered but are the policies working. as we spend the city budget, $60, $70 billion a year, what are we getting back? in other words, are we asking the right questions. that analytical question needs to be asked and the controller has not fulfilled, historically, the full capacity of that jurisdiction to do that. these are areas that can be very important and can contribute to
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the public debate. >> eliot, when you were attorney general, you obviously changed that position not just for new york state but nationwide a lot of people, a lot of lawyers decided they wanted to be ag's even before they thought about running for governor. can we expect the same in this role, in this capacity? also will you be echoing on the campaign trail what mark halperin said this morning, which this is a weak field, i think even sam stein, this is a very weak field of candidates for mayor when you compare them to the last two people that have been in office. you need all hands on deck moving forward to make sure this transition moves smoothly. >> let me say this. remember when bill clinton early on in new hampshire was one of the seven dwarfs. people do fulfill roles in a certain way. >> we got that right. >> could be that one of these candidates we're diminishing or
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the media is diminishing will emerge as mayor. it's premature to judge. i don't want to say i want to make controller outsized position, i'm going to do what's right and necessary for that job, the fiscal watchdog, guard pension funds, invest wisely, participate in corporate governance and to use a position that i think can be very important. >> so as personally as you can answer this question, don't give me a pat answer, don't give me one you prepare in your mind, how are you different than you were five or six years ago in what has changed of who you were? >> a lot of pain. a lot of pain. >> that's it? >> yeah. you go through that pain, you change. >> all right. former governor elliiot spitzer thank you very much for coming on the show.
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up next we'll talk to nba all-star ray allen. he's going off the court to washington to something close to his heart. we'll be right back. looked nice? soft would be great, but we really just need "kid-proof." softsprings got both, let me show you. right over here. here, feel this. wow, that's nice. wow. the soft carpets have never been this durable. you know i think we'll take it. get kid-friendly toughness and feet-friendly softness, without walking all over your budget. he didn't tell us it would do this. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. right now, get whole-home installation for just 37 bucks.
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39 past the hour. here with us from washington, shooting guard for nba champions, the miami heat, ray allen. >> no heat fans here? he's the reason -- i'm sorry for all of them. >> can i just say i'm not really into -- he's got a fantastic smile. >> and he's an incredible player. >> from yukon, championship with the celtics. >> he's the reason -- >> okay. okay. okay. lets get to business here.
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>> okay. to business now. tomorrow, ray will testify before the senate special committee on ageing to make his case for more funding for type 1 diabetes research. it's an issue near to ray's heart. his 6-year-old son walker has type 1 diabetes. >> it does. ray, when my son was 4, he had the telltale signs of diabetes. any parents that's been through this, i a nightmare. i had a support group, as i'm sure you do, they have been saying the cure is around the corner for 20 years and it remains elusive. talk about the research needed to help not only your son and my son but millions and millions who suffer from this deadly disease every year. >> starting back in '99 they started this children's congress. the kids wanted the voice. they wanted to go to d.c. and
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let politicians, lawmakers know they want them to be heard. they want their voices to be spoken up in front of congress. we've got to make sure we continue the stp, they call it, special diabetes funding, to continue. there's people all over america scientists they are funding. there's a pancreas project being taken care of coming out of stanford currently as we speak. there's so many things. but again, being a father, we fight every single day to try to find a way to find a cure. people every day are living with this disease. >> andrew, nicole went to that children's congress in 1989, he was 8 years old, he's 20 now. we're still fighting, trying to find the cure. >> what do you hope? obviously you can get attention around any issue you focus on. what can you do? what can you hope to change?
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do you want to move this up the agen agenda? are there specific funding levels you'd like to reach? making it part covered by health care? what is it you want to see accomplished? >> first, one my son was diagnosed in 2008, he was 17-month-old. so many people around us told us we should keep this a private matter. as we started learning more about diabetes, we learned how many people were afflicted with the disease not only in america but around the world. we said, no, this is something we have to talk about. we have to get people to understand the warning signs of diabetes. kids have been misdiagnosed and lost their lives because of it. first and foremost we want people to understand what diabetes is all about. it is a deadly disease. kids, adults live with it all around the world and are healthy with it. what we want to accomplish is, we want to make sure congress continues to renew these funds allocated for the jdrf, because
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this funding is important for these scientists to continue research every single year. it's just like anything else, we've got to run through the finish line because we're getting so close to finding the cure for diabetes. at the same time there's so many things that go on on a daily basis as far as research, making sure kids have the tools necessary to take care of diabetes, make sure there's great awareness going on, not om monks families but communities and schools around america. >> we love what you're doing. ray allen, thank you very much. great to have you on the show. come back, okay? more "morning joe" when we come back. we'll be back in a minute. my mantra? trust your instincts to make the call. to treat my low testosterone, my doctor and i went with axiron,
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everybody, everybody from my past. i'm freaked out right now. "new york times" best selling author brad thor, the new novel, "hidden order" a thriller. burt lance. you know everybody. >> if it ain't broke, don't fix it. >> exactly. nicolle wallace is running this segment. >> we share a gifted editor and i know emily is watching, so i want to gunfire you a chance to talk about the book. >> when 9/11 happened, i got stranded on the east coast. my wife and i were on our way
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overseas to go to greece. we decided to make the most of it. we ended up in a tiny island off georgia, jekyll island, a group for secretive than nsa and some claim more powerful than united states government. for a thriller writer, this kind of thing -- as i researched this group, it was like pages ripped out of a spy novel. i said, someday when the time is write in america i'm going to include this in the backdrop of one of my thrillers. that's what i've done. it's the next big scandal, the next big thing we'll talk about in public square. >> do you feel like life is imitating art or art imitating life with snowden, all the revelations about the nsa and what not. >> i have to tell you, it's interesting, the department of homeland security brought me into something called redland program, they said we want you to come in and plot terrorist attacks like you do for your books. a thriller writer is someone who
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trained their mind to miss behave. when i look at this stuff -- >> some people think the government is being trained to miss behave. writes the line? >> i believe if something bad is going on, we need whistleblowers. my concern is, i don't want 20 years old like snowden and bradley manning deciding on their own what should be a national security secret and what shouldn't. we have good, honest people in washington you can find to champion your cause and take it up for you. going right to the media is dangerous. i don't want them to decide should the list get out, expose people, allies, assets. i think it's a dangerous precedent. >> to impact history one needed to be the epicenter where history was made. for him that epicenter was federal reserve. i've had people say to me, conspiracy theorists about its power and who is behind it. the conspiracy theory about the immense power of the fed, how much do you buy into it? >> i'll tell you this, as an american citizen i'm concerned the fed is unaccountable to any of us.
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we can't vote them in. we can't vote them out. at the end of the day any responsible person, democrat, republican, is going to say what's the litmus test. nobody is talking fed. we're talking irs, nsa, the fed loves it, because the fed is 100 years old this year. the dollar is worth 90% less than when it started? is it working? is it good, not good? i thought all the things behind the fed -- the fed is about as federal as federal express, it's not government, but most people think it is. if i can weave intrigue, play with the conspiracy theory, toss out a couple of interesting things i found out about the fed and put it into a good read -- >> you don't get writer's block. >> i don't. >> you've never had it, ever. i can tell. >> it's a condition. you have a condition. >> it's a gift, i hope. >> it's a gift and a condition. all right. the new novel, "the hidden
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wi drive a ford fusion. who is healthier, you or your car? i would say my car. probably the car. cause as you get older you start breaking down. i love my car. i want to take care of it. i have a bad wheel - i must say. my car is running quite well. keep your car healthy with the works. $29.95 or less after $10 mail-in rebate at your participating ford dealer. so you gotta take care of yourself? yes you do. you gotta take care of your baby? oh yeah! how are you different than you were five or six years ago? what has changed personally? >> a lot of pain. a lot of pain.
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>> that's it? >> yeah. you go through that pain, you change. >> okay. that was one of the moments from our extended interview with eliot spitzer earlier today. that was incredibly interesting on a number of levels. you can see it on our website if you didn't catch it. mojo.msnbc.com. i still haven't figured out what i learned today. that's where i'll leave that. >> people can be critical how new york focused we can be with anthony weiner. watching spitzer and how this will develop will be very interesting, i think, for politics in general. >> it's the human tragedy of it all. i learned enough about eliot spitzer to say i'd support him in this job after watching you two. >> there's going to be a national debate about that moment you had with him, whether they were real tears or not.
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on twitter they are already breaking it down, whether those were real tears or not. did you think -- >> it felt real to me. i was sitting there. felt real to me. >> no matter what you think about him and what he did, he was raw and all there. it was pretty powerful. don't know if it will change things for him, but i do appreciate a person who has made mistakes coming and facing the cameras and facing the questions. that's actually a test of character. there are those that choose not to do that. that's it for us today. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe," but now it's time for chuck todd and "the daily rundown." this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. that's more pick of the courtroom in sanford, florida, where shortly george zimmerman's defense team will call witnesses to the stand. right now the court is considerin